• FAQs

FAQs

Below you will find answers to a number of frequently asked questions (FAQs).

If you have further questions, please see our get in touch page

What is CAM?

CAM will bring high quality, integrated public transport to Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. It will connect towns, villages, major employment sites and the city of Cambridge, offering fast, frequent, clean and reliable journeys. CAM will cut congestion by reducing car use and it will improve the environment and air quality by using zero emission vehicles.

CAM will seamlessly connect and interchange with other transport, including buses and rail. It will also join up with new infrastructure being built such as East West Rail and Cambridge South rail station.

  • Business case work so far has identified the need for tunnels under Cambridge, including two stations for interchange, at the city centre and the railway station.
  • CAM will initially extend from St Neots to Haverhill and from Alconbury to Mildenhall, via tunnels under Cambridge. The extent of the CAM network is designed to be flexible, and other locations are also being explored.

An indicative map of how the CAM network would look is shown below.

Why do we need CAM?

Rapid growth of the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough economy has brought prosperity and jobs but it has also brought congestion and high house prices. Investment in transport infrastructure has not kept pace with growth and not enough homes have been built to meet demand, making property prices some of the least affordable in the country.

By investing in brand new, fast, reliable, affordable public transport, CAM will not only deliver better journeys, it will also enable sustainable new housing to be built, while boosting businesses, creating jobs and connecting people to greater opportunities.

The continued success of the dynamic, innovative and highly-skilled, economy of Cambridgeshire and Peterborough is vital for local people and business, and of strategic national importance, helping this country compete globally in a technology-driven world.

When will CAM be ready?

A review of progress so far recommended that the best way to advance CAM was to ensure it was delivered as one joined up system, rather than breaking it down into separate route projects. Preparations are underway to detail an overarching strategy for the whole project, known as a One CAM approach. This is planned to lead to the development of a programme-wide business case as a key next phase, anticipated to start in early spring 2021.

Who is paying for CAM?

A mixture of funding sources will be required to cover the costs of delivering the CAM. A separate funding and financing strategy is currently being developed.

Potential sources of funding for CAM include central government, private investment and local contributions. Innovative approaches to meeting the cost of CAM include land value capture and tax increment financing.

Who is behind CAM?

The Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Combined Authority is the Transport Authority responsible for transport planning and public transport in the area. It brings together the area’s seven local councils and is chaired by a directly elected Mayor.

The Mayoral Combined Authority was formed under the 2017 Devolution Deal. It is working to meet its commitments set up under that deal to increase the size of the economy and make the region a leading place in the world to live, learn and work.

To do so it is investing in a better transport network, delivering more housing, helping businesses to grow and create more jobs and giving people the skills they need to thrive in the modern economy.

To give CAM the dedicated resource and expertise needed, the Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Combined Authority has established a separate company focused entirely on its delivery.

The company, called a special purpose vehicle, is wholly owned by the Combined Authority and is called One CAM Limited.

Most large infrastructure projects like Crossrail, HS2 and East West Rail have such delivery bodies.

One CAM Limited was incorporated in September 2020. On September 30, 2020, Cambridge’s Lord Mair, Robert Mair CBE, was appointed as the first chair of the One CAM Limited Board.

For more information about the Combined Authority, visit their website.

Why is CAM not stopping in my town? Will you consider going through my town?

At present, only major destinations are illustrated on the CAM network map. The exact locations of CAM stations have not yet been decided and will be informed by future technical and engineering work and will be subject to future consultation.

The CAM is intended to be a flexible network, with the ability to offer extensions to other places if a case can be made for the benefits it would bring.

What is One CAM Limited?

To give CAM the dedicated resource and expertise needed, the Cambridgeshire & Peterborough Combined Authority has established a separate company focused entirely on its delivery.

The company, called a special purpose vehicle, is wholly owned by the Combined Authority, and is called One CAM Limited. One CAM Limited will be focused on developing and building CAM, with the Mayoral Combined Authority ensuring the project delivers the overarching objectives of the network.

One CAM Limited is still being established. It will have a Board, an executive team and a programme team. Most large infrastructure projects like Crossrail, HS2 and East West Rail have such delivery bodies.

One CAM Limited was incorporated in September 2020. On September 30, 2020, Cambridge’s Lord Mair, Robert Mair CBE, was appointed as the first chair of the One CAM Limited Board.

Will the regional routes be extended further to locations such as Peterborough?

The benefits that would come from potential extensions of the CAM network to other locations will be assessed as part of future work.

The ambition for CAM is for a flexible network, which can extend to other locations across the region.

Is Cambridge a safe place to tunnel?

The majority of any tunnelling under Cambridge will be within what is known as gault clay. This is not dissimilar to London clay, which is understood to be well-suited to tunnelling due to its consistent and cohesive nature. Further technical and engineering work will identify in more detail how tunnelling would work.